Bar à sourire
worldoftoday:

This is Rick, the NYPD “Hipster Cop.” I briefly met this guy while reporting on the Occupy Wall Street Radiohead concert that never happened.  He was standing next to the Occupy Wall Street spokesman who had told me over and over that day that Radiohead would definitely be playing no matter what their publicist said, just come down.
When I met him, Hipster Cop was wearing a bright red Mister Rogers cardigan and a white button down with a clipped tie, grey wool slacks and spotless oxfords, a smirk on his face. He was the most sharply-dressed guy I had seen pretty much all week, and I work in Soho. Hipster Cop almost looked too well-dressed to be a Radiohead fan; like, maybe he only listened to LPs of obscure Japanese bands from the 80s. But I asked if he was bummed about Radiohead’s no-show: “They’re finished,” he joked. “Nobody’s going to listen to their music anymore.”
But he was a cop! Which I learned when he flashed a badge hooked discreetly onto his belt and shooed away the uniformed officer who eventually came over to move us from the street where we were chatting onto the sidewalk. You could tell she was embarrassed; guess he’s like that cool detective at the police station that nobody wants to talk to about movies or music or anything ‘cause he’ll scoff at them. 
Since then, Hipster Cop has become sort of a meme at Occupy Wall Street. This woman even called him “infamous.”
What if all cops looked like this? What if pepper-spray cop Anthony Bologna looked like this? What if, during the 2008 NYC Republican Convention, CNN broadcast live footage of dozens of hipster cops charging through the tear gas behind riot shields with Pavement bumper stickers on them, beating protesters with vintage 1920s nightsticks they picked up at the thrift store, precisely-clipped ties fluttering behind them? 
Update: This NYU student, Brett Chamberlain, just tweeted to me that Hipster Cop asked him out to dinner.

No joke he asked me out to dinner. his name is Rick btw. Community affairs / detective with #NYPD precinct 1.  I told him if he saw me in cuffs and let me out I would go to dinner with him. He missed his chance when I got arrested.

I don’t know… It’s almost too good to be true. Gay hipster cop finds love at the anti-capitalist protest? #OccupyMyHeart
(pic via Lucy Kafanov)

worldoftoday:

This is Rick, the NYPD “Hipster Cop.” I briefly met this guy while reporting on the Occupy Wall Street Radiohead concert that never happened.  He was standing next to the Occupy Wall Street spokesman who had told me over and over that day that Radiohead would definitely be playing no matter what their publicist said, just come down.

When I met him, Hipster Cop was wearing a bright red Mister Rogers cardigan and a white button down with a clipped tie, grey wool slacks and spotless oxfords, a smirk on his face. He was the most sharply-dressed guy I had seen pretty much all week, and I work in Soho. Hipster Cop almost looked too well-dressed to be a Radiohead fan; like, maybe he only listened to LPs of obscure Japanese bands from the 80s. But I asked if he was bummed about Radiohead’s no-show: “They’re finished,” he joked. “Nobody’s going to listen to their music anymore.”

But he was a cop! Which I learned when he flashed a badge hooked discreetly onto his belt and shooed away the uniformed officer who eventually came over to move us from the street where we were chatting onto the sidewalk. You could tell she was embarrassed; guess he’s like that cool detective at the police station that nobody wants to talk to about movies or music or anything ‘cause he’ll scoff at them. 

Since then, Hipster Cop has become sort of a meme at Occupy Wall Street. This woman even called him “infamous.”

What if all cops looked like this? What if pepper-spray cop Anthony Bologna looked like this? What if, during the 2008 NYC Republican Convention, CNN broadcast live footage of dozens of hipster cops charging through the tear gas behind riot shields with Pavement bumper stickers on them, beating protesters with vintage 1920s nightsticks they picked up at the thrift store, precisely-clipped ties fluttering behind them? 

Update: This NYU student, Brett Chamberlain, just tweeted to me that Hipster Cop asked him out to dinner.

No joke he asked me out to dinner. his name is Rick btw. Community affairs / detective with #NYPD precinct 1.  I told him if he saw me in cuffs and let me out I would go to dinner with him. He missed his chance when I got arrested.

I don’t know… It’s almost too good to be true. Gay hipster cop finds love at the anti-capitalist protest? #OccupyMyHeart

(pic via Lucy Kafanov)

pixelpolitics:

…with a surprise!

Do your Wednesdays feel joyless and empty now Parliament’s in its summer recess? Does 12 o’clock pass without event, leaving you deflated and depressed?

Prime Minister’s Questions is every political nut’s favourite time of the week and we all deserve to enjoy it whenever we…

derekeads:

Johnny Depp by Derek Eads

derekeads:

Johnny Depp by Derek Eads

Spread of Earthquake-Related Tweets

miguelrios:

Below is a visual of the Tweets from VA and Washington, DC one minute after the August 23 #earthquake.

This is an official Twitter visualization we created to see how far and fast a tweet can travel. This is part of what we do on Twitter’s analytics team. Join us: http://twitter.com/jobs .

taitems:

iOS Inspired jQuery Mobile Theme
jQuery Mobile doesn’t deviate far from the pattern established by its sibling libraries: provide something that normalises functionality and/or design across browsers and operating systems. 
The work by the Filament Group has been vital for standardising the look and feel of jQuery Mobile, especially when dealing with incredibly dated or under-featured mobile browsers. Borrowing upon conventions established by both the iOS and Android operating systems, they created something that is palatable across a range of devices.
There will be odd instances when you need an application to look as close to native as possible. I completely agree with the Filament Group’s arguments against this, but currently designers are forced to roll their own solution. What I have created is the beta framework for an iOS-inspired theme that attempts to bring jQuery inline with the native iOS UI elements. I actually began this project when the first alpha was released, but with taking on a new job and other responsibilities, I found myself lagging behind the release schedule. I’m not sure of the response this will get, so hopefully I can gauge how much time I should spend on this in future.

But without further ado: here is the iOS-inspired theme for jQuery Mobile. It works great in Chrome, Safari, iPhone and iPad mobile Safaris.
  
Some Caveats
To achieve the look of the iOS style back button with CSS3, the HTML is customised and therefore must be copied and pasted manually. The back button template can be found in the GitHub readme file.
The CSS3 back button isn’t perfect, there are some jaggedness and shadow issues.
Plenty of elements still remain unstyled, or are missing hit state styling.
Cross browser compliance is a low priority.
This is an add-on theming layer. It was impossible to fork the actual jQuery Mobile theme and attempt to keep up with their changes, so this just sits as a skinning layer on top.
Some Issues This Exposes in jQuery Mobile
Dialogs need some serious work. I could have spent a lot of time and made my dialogs look exactly like the iOS ones, but this would have involved some pretty hectic CSS and JavaScript. As is I had to do a bit of a work around to get them to dock to the bottom and not the top. Most notably broken, the inability for these dialogs to behave like modals - showing the background as obscured.
Back button syntax. They’re are definitely some cleaner ways to create the iOS style back buttons. I was keen to avoid images, but an image mask might have done really well in this situation. Regardless of that, you will probably find yourself plugging in custom HTML when working with jQuery mobile, and not just the buttons.
It’s bloody hard to keep up with the release cycle. This is not a bad thing ;)
I am, as always, open to merging pull requests and suggestions to help improve this project. I must also stress that it is important that truly innovative changes best be held off until jQuery Mobile makes it out of beta. ■

taitems:

iOS Inspired jQuery Mobile Theme

jQuery Mobile doesn’t deviate far from the pattern established by its sibling libraries: provide something that normalises functionality and/or design across browsers and operating systems. 

The work by the Filament Group has been vital for standardising the look and feel of jQuery Mobile, especially when dealing with incredibly dated or under-featured mobile browsers. Borrowing upon conventions established by both the iOS and Android operating systems, they created something that is palatable across a range of devices.

There will be odd instances when you need an application to look as close to native as possible. I completely agree with the Filament Group’s arguments against this, but currently designers are forced to roll their own solution. What I have created is the beta framework for an iOS-inspired theme that attempts to bring jQuery inline with the native iOS UI elements. I actually began this project when the first alpha was released, but with taking on a new job and other responsibilities, I found myself lagging behind the release schedule. I’m not sure of the response this will get, so hopefully I can gauge how much time I should spend on this in future.


But without further ado: here is the iOS-inspired theme for jQuery Mobile. It works great in Chrome, Safari, iPhone and iPad mobile Safaris.

  

Some Caveats

  • To achieve the look of the iOS style back button with CSS3, the HTML is customised and therefore must be copied and pasted manually. The back button template can be found in the GitHub readme file.
  • The CSS3 back button isn’t perfect, there are some jaggedness and shadow issues.
  • Plenty of elements still remain unstyled, or are missing hit state styling.
  • Cross browser compliance is a low priority.
  • This is an add-on theming layer. It was impossible to fork the actual jQuery Mobile theme and attempt to keep up with their changes, so this just sits as a skinning layer on top.

Some Issues This Exposes in jQuery Mobile

  • Dialogs need some serious work. I could have spent a lot of time and made my dialogs look exactly like the iOS ones, but this would have involved some pretty hectic CSS and JavaScript. As is I had to do a bit of a work around to get them to dock to the bottom and not the top. Most notably broken, the inability for these dialogs to behave like modals - showing the background as obscured.
  • Back button syntax. They’re are definitely some cleaner ways to create the iOS style back buttons. I was keen to avoid images, but an image mask might have done really well in this situation. Regardless of that, you will probably find yourself plugging in custom HTML when working with jQuery mobile, and not just the buttons.
  • It’s bloody hard to keep up with the release cycle. This is not a bad thing ;)

I am, as always, open to merging pull requests and suggestions to help improve this project. I must also stress that it is important that truly innovative changes best be held off until jQuery Mobile makes it out of beta. 

dvdp:

110522

dvdp:

110522

(Alternate title: The New Work Ethic)

I wrote this email to a friend a few weeks ago, and then the topic came up again last night with an old buddy who was frustrated with his work. He seemed to appreciate what I had to say, so I figured it might be worth sharing:

- - -

Thinking about your…

maura:

I guess one of the benefits of beginning my blogging “career”* while I was still living with my parents was treating every semi-public piece of content I placed on the Internet like something my mom, who I love but who has very rigid ideas of what personal details are “nice” for people to publicly…

About EOA5, part 4

mspandrew:

Ehhh I’ve got to get back to work soon so let’s see how fast I can knock out the rest of this.

Read More

In response to Wired.com’s scoop identifying the finder of the lost iPhone prototype, many have asked me how we did it. The process of uncovering digital footprints to identify Brian Hogan was indeed challenging and enlightening, so I thought I’d tell the story here. Heck, it might even teach…